5-iron Tempo Drill

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5-iron Tempo Drill
Category: Distance
Sub-Category: Swing Drills, Trajectory

Video Transcript

Video Golf Tip | 5-iron Tempo Drill
By Katherine Marren

There is a great drill you can use at the driving range to learn about trajectory and distance control. I ask my students to get their 150 yard club and to hit four balls. They need to hit the first ball 75 yards, the second ball 100 yards, the third ball 125 yards and the last shot is their 150 shot. You have to do this drill using a full swing so they are going to have to learn about controlling the speed of their swing. When they hit these different shots they are going to learn about trajectory and they will be able to use these shots on the golf course in the wind and to get out of trouble. It is also a great level of effort drill, let me demonstrate. I have my 150 club and in making a full swing I have to swing slow enough to only hit the ball 75 yards, the ball goes low, that would be a great one to get out from under the trees. Now I am going to hit it 100 yards, just a little more speed, perfect. Now I am going to go for 125 yards, almost my normal speed, a little freer. You can notice that the ball is going higher and higher each time you hit a shot. Now this is my regular speed, the ball goes really high and on its regular trajectory path. This is a great drill to learn about trajectory and distance control and you can use these shots on the golf course more than you can ever think.


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