Posture-Related Causes of Over-Rotation

Posture-Related Causes of Over-Rotation

Other videos in the series Exercises for Proper Golf Posture with Ramsay McMaster:

Denis: So how does this lack of postural tone at setup affect the golf swing? Well, often I see this sort of position here creating what we call an ‘over-rotation’. Now, an over-rotation basically comes about because the vertebrae aren’t able to rotate and the body is not able to have rotation through the spine. So, rather than this sort of motion here where the vertebrae are rotating and there being a difference between the amount of shoulder turn and hip turn, this poor postural position here sees everything moving in one block in both backswing and downswing. Now the way that will manifest itself in the golf swing is by an over-rotation and by over-rotation I mean this sort of movement here where the body has turned very quickly, the arms and clubhead are pulled to the inside because it’s all moving as one block going back, it moves as one block coming down and we typically end up with an out-to-in path. So, an over-rotation causes this sort of movement on the way back and this sort of movement on the way down. The spine is not able to function properly or normally, the vertebrae aren’t able to rotate and we’re not able to get that quality turn and pivot we see in a better player. Ramsay: Let’s talk about that over-rotation and relate it to the golfer’s body. As we talked about, keeping good posture is firing the right muscles and keeping the spine in the right position to allow good sequencing through the spine itself. If I keep my good posture and I work my shoulder muscles, my inner thigh muscles, my tummy muscles, I can actually feel the spine move straightaway, back and forward. However, if I get in a slump posture as Denis said, rounded, flexed as if I was at a computer or at a car you can actually feel the difference that our shoulders and our hips want to do all the work. That’s because the ball and socket joints, they will compensate. They can get that over-compensation because they’ve got more movement in them. That is going to effect the sequencing in the golf swing and you’re not going to be able to rotate as well without working those muscles and working the spinal positions. Here is a simple exercise you can do to make sure that you keep good posture and you sequence through your spine first in your golf swing.

Category: Posture
Sub-Category: Fitness, Swing Plane
About the Instructor
Ramsay McMaster
Ramsay McMaster
The Melbourne Golf Injury Clinic
1100 Dandenong Road
Carnegie, VIC 3163
Melbourne, Australia

Ramsay McMaster is Director of the Melbourne Golf Injury Clinic and serves as a fitness consultant to PGA Tour Pros around the world. He is also the author of Get Fit for Golf and Training for Golf.


ACTIVITY FEED

Thomas A. joined GolfLink
David T. joined GolfLink
Ivan C. joined GolfLink
Denise S. joined GolfLink
Butch K. joined GolfLink

View Activity Feed

Video of the Day
Ball Position in Set Up Watch Video>>

Teaching Your Kids Golf Take your kids out to play early and learn late in the da,y and teach them in small periods of time, so they enjoy and learn the fun of the golf course
Sample Pre-Shot Routine Try using a few of these steps to create your own personalized pre-shot routine which will help clear your mind while creating the perfect alignment, ball position and clubface needed for consistency
Putting Mental Discipline Use the Aim, Look and Go system to take care of your putting set up prior to the putt so you can clear your head of all thoughts and putt relaxed