Stop Over-Rotating in Your Golf Swing with These Simple Posture Corrections

Stop Over-Rotating in Your Golf Swing with These Simple Posture Corrections

Other videos in the series Exercises for Proper Golf Posture with Ramsay McMaster:

Denis: So how does this lack of postural tone at setup affect the golf swing? Well, often I see this sort of position here creating what we call an 'over-rotation.' Now, an over-rotation basically comes about because the vertebrae aren't able to rotate and the body is not able to have rotation through the spine.

What is Over-Rotation in Golf?

So, rather than this sort of motion here where the vertebrae are rotating and there being a difference between the amount of shoulder turn and hip turn, this poor postural position here sees everything moving in one block in both backswing and downswing.

Now the way that will manifest itself in the golf swing is by an over-rotation and by over-rotation I mean this sort of movement here where the body has turned very quickly, the arms and clubhead are pulled to the inside because it's all moving as one block going back, it moves as one block coming down and we typically end up with an out-to-in path.

Over-Rotation Stops Proper Spine Functioning

So, an over-rotation causes this sort of movement on the way back and this sort of movement on the way down. The spine is not able to function properly or normally, the vertebrae aren't able to rotate and we're not able to get that quality turn and pivot we see in a better player.

Ramsay: Let's talk about that over-rotation and relate it to the golfer's body. As we talked about, keeping good posture is firing the right muscles and keeping the spine in the right position to allow good sequencing through the spine itself. If I keep my good posture and I work my shoulder muscles, my inner thigh muscles, my tummy muscles, I can actually feel the spine move straightaway, back and forward.

Avoiding Slump Posture

However, if I get in a slump posture as Denis said, rounded, flexed as if I was at a computer or at a car you can actually feel the difference that our shoulders and our hips want to do all the work. That's because the ball and socket joints, they will compensate.

They can get that over-compensation because they've got more movement in them. That is going to effect the sequencing in the golf swing and you're not going to be able to rotate as well without working those muscles and working the spinal positions. Here is a simple exercise you can do to make sure that you keep good posture and you sequence through your spine first in your golf swing.

Category: Posture
Sub-Category: Fitness, Swing Plane
About the Instructor
Ramsay McMaster
Ramsay McMaster
The Melbourne Golf Injury Clinic
1100 Dandenong Road
Carnegie, VIC 3163
Melbourne, Australia

Ramsay McMaster is Director of the Melbourne Golf Injury Clinic and serves as a fitness consultant to PGA Tour Pros around the world. He is also the author of Get Fit for Golf and Training for Golf.


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