How To Do A Stack And Tilt Golf Swing

By Bill Herrfeldt

It seems like every time you turn to golf on television, you hear about the so-called Stack and Tilt golf swing. It became more of a rage when professional golfers like Mike Weir, Zack Johnson and Aaron Baddeley started to use this swing because it not only improved their accuracy but it caused them to hit the golf ball even farther. The Stack and Tilt golf swing was developed by Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett, two of golf's hottest teachers who now work with about 20 players on the PGA tournament circuit. Let's take a look at this revolutionary swing, and then you can decide for yourself if it is right for you.

Instructions

Difficulty: Challenging
Step 1
Keep all your weight on the front foot, from the take-away through the follow-through. That flies in the face of traditional instruction that tells you to shift your weight to your rear foot as you approach the top of your swing, and then move your weight to the front foot during the second part of your swing. In fact, proponents of the Stack and Tilt method advocate that you place even more of your weight over your front leg during your take-away, which is totally different from what most golfers were taught.
Step 2
Change your leg action if you choose to adopt the Stack and Tilt golf swing. You were taught to bend both of your knees and to bow your torso on the follow-through. With the Stack and Tilt, you are taught to straighten your back leg at the apex of your swing, and then put the remainder of your weight over your front foot as you complete your swing.
Step 3
Take a steeper backswing as you press on your front foot during your take-away. By doing so, your ball will fly lower causing you to hit longer tee shots because the ball will run further on most fairways. Also, you will hit fewer topped shot and you will become a more consistent golfer.
Step 4
Abandon the Stack and Tilt golf swing if you cannot spend the time necessary to integrate it into your game, because it is different from any other you may have been taught. In fact, while many tour professionals have adopted some of the philosophy of the Stack and Tilt swing, most of them have swings that match their physical characteristics such as height, weight and strength.

About The Author

Bill Herrfeldt specializes in finance, sports and the needs of retiring people, and has been published in the national edition of "Erickson Tribune," the "Washington Post" and the "Arizona Republic." He graduated from the University of Louisville.

ACTIVITY FEED

Ryan C. joined GolfLink
Scott M. joined GolfLink
Terry L. joined GolfLink
Ronald J. joined GolfLink
Bruce A. joined GolfLink

View Activity Feed

Related Articles

Article Image Bingo Bango Bongo: Guide to This Unique Golf Game

Golf games are a great way to shake up your golf round, that is unt...

Article Image The Biggest 54-Hole Comebacks in U.S. Open History

No 54-hole lead at the U.S. Open is safe. In fact, since the U.S. O...

Article Image What Is the Average Distance With Each Golf Club?

.videowrapper { float: none; clear: both; width: 100%;...

Article Image Complete Guide to Gamesmanship in Golf

When it comes to gamesmanship, there are two types of golfers: thos...

Article Image Improve Your Golf Swing Mechanics in 6 Easy Steps

One of the toughest parts of learning how to swing a golf club is b...

View All Related Articles