How To Play Match Play

By Jackson Lewis

Match play in golf is a different game than what most golfers and fans are used to playing and watching in traditional stroke play. In match play, a player (or a player's team) earns points for every hole that he beats the opponent. The total number of strokes that a player scores over the course of the round does not impact the outcome of the round. Match play can be played individually or as a team.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy
Step 1
Keep score by hole versus maintaining stroke totals as in traditional play. In the match play format, you or a team you belong to play against another individual or team. The game can consist of one or many rounds agreed to before the match commences. Score is kept by hole, where a person wins the hole by "holing out" in less strokes than the opponent. In a game where you are using handicap, the lowest net score wins the hole being played.
Step 2
Win the match by obtaining a lead greater than the number of holes left to be played in the match. If a match ends in a tie, then the organization running the match may extend the contest to decide a clear winner.
Step 3
Concede the match at any time during play. You can also concede a hole any time prior to starting or finishing the hole, but not after completion of play on the hole. An opponent's next stroke may also be conceded as long as his ball is at rest and he is considered to have holed out on the stroke you concede. You can not turn down a concession by an opponent nor withdraw a concession once you make one in match play.
Step 4
Lose a hole in match play for rule infractions. During match play the loss of a hole occurs when you would have incurred a stroke penalty in normal golf play.

Tips & Warnings

You or your team is considered to be "dormie" when you are up by as many holes that are left to play. You are considered to have "halved" a hole if each side playing the hole finishes with the same score.
You or your team is considered to be "dormie" when you are up by as many holes that are left to play.
You are considered to have "halved" a hole if each side playing the hole finishes with the same score.

About The Author

Based in Memphis, Jackson Lewis has been writing on technology-related material for 10 years with a recent emphasis on golf and other sports. He has been freelance writing for Demand Media since 2008. Lewis holds a Master of Science in computer science from the United States Naval Postgraduate School.

ACTIVITY FEED

Larry B. joined GolfLink
Mike C. joined GolfLink
Ryan S. joined GolfLink
Nelson K. joined GolfLink

View Activity Feed

Video of the Day
Hitting Over Trees Watch Video>>

Related Articles

Article Image Ideas for Golf Tournaments

A golf tournament is a great way to raise money for a charitabl...

Article Image Types of Golf Tournaments

For some golfers, the game is all about relaxation. They want t...

Article Image The History of Pebble Beach Golf

Pebble Beach is among the premier golfing attractions in Califo...

Article Image Official Golf Rules on Identifying Golf Balls

There are specific rules when playing in a tournament or a matc...

Article Image PGA Championship History

The PGA Championship is one of golf's four major championsh...

View All Related Articles