How to Practice Golf On A Limited Budget

By Glenn Mcanally

For the most part, golf is an expensive sport. The famous golf course in Pebble Beach, California, charges between $400 and $500 for 18 holes. Many professional golfers grew up playing at private country clubs and played unlimited golf, which is not an option for most golfers. Even going to the local driving range every day can cost almost $50 a week if you buy six buckets of range balls. But there are steps to help your game without spending a lot of money.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate
Step 1
Find a field with a small area of grass that isn't too short or long and most closely duplicates conditions on a golf course fairway. This saves you from having to spend $20 to $30 weekly on range balls.
Step 2
You can work on your putting at a local public golf course or golf practice center. There is no charge for putting practice.
Step 3
Work on your chipping in a grass field with very short grass. Golf courses almost always charge by the hour to practice chipping in a designated chipping area. You will not be allowed to chip near the greens that are designated for putting practice only.
Step 4
Save on expensive lessons by using a camcorder to analyze your swing. You can then view your swing and compare it with videos of the pros that can be found on YouTube.
Step 5
Put what you've learned to practice by playing a round of golf on a public course during off-peak times. The greens fees can be up to 50 percent lower if you play on the weekdays.

Tips & Warnings

Try practicing your shots with your driver at the practice range by getting free balls. Many driving ranges have balls that fly over or roll under the nets. These balls cannot be easily retrieved by the ball retrieving tractor. Suggest to the range's manager that you can retrieve these balls for the chance to hit them on the range. You will actually be doing them a favor.
Do not practice getting out of the sand trap in a sand-covered playground. You need to know for sure it is the same sand used on golf courses or the wrong grains of sand can cause damage to your club. Double check for signs around open fields that state whether golf is permitted, and be sure there are no people or houses that your ball could possibly strike.
Do not practice getting out of the sand trap in a sand-covered playground. You need to know for sure it is the same sand used on golf courses or the wrong grains of sand can cause damage to your club.
Double check for signs around open fields that state whether golf is permitted, and be sure there are no people or houses that your ball could possibly strike.

About The Author

Glenn McAnally is a thriller novelist and life long golfer who lives in Southern California. His most recent work is the action thriller Endangered as well as a story credit for the upcoming Nintendo DS title Elite Forces: Unit 77. He is a graduate of Villanova University.

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