The 12 Best Cheap Golf Balls You Should Actually Play in 2022

By Nick Heidelberger

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Four value golf balls

Whether you’re looking for the cheapest golf ball you can put in play, or the best performing value golf ball on the market, there are countless budget golf ball options available. With so many options, it can be hard to sort out the very best. That’s why we’ve put together this in-depth guide to the best cheap golf balls you can buy.

The first question you should answer choosing a golf ball is, what are your top priorities? Are you looking for the absolute cheapest ball you can play, with no concern for performance? Or are you willing to pay up to $30 per dozen for a ball that performs like a $50 per dozen ball?

If you’re a brand new golfer, it’s unlikely that you will benefit from the high-tech, and expensive, performance features built into today’s top-of-the-line golf balls. It’s more likely that you’re focused on honing your swing fundamentals and perhaps you need a ball you can afford to hit out-of-bounds or into the water more often than you’d like.

Golf is an expensive sport. If you’re an experienced or improving player on a budget, you probably need performance out of your ball, and simply being able to afford to lose a lot of them won’t cut it. You are more likely to benefit from a ball that gives you 90 percent of the performance benefits of a premium golf ball at 50 percent of the price.

The Best Cheap Golf Balls

We understand that every golfer is different. That’s why we’ve rounded up the 12 best cheap and value golf balls into one comprehensive list. No matter what you need from an affordable golf ball, we’ve got an option for you.

Ball

Cost/Dozen

Player Profile

Standout Feature

Kirkland Signature v2.0

$18

Mid to low handicap player looking for performance.

Dollar-for-dollar the best golf ball on the market.

Titleist TruFeel

$23

Competitive player with moderate swing speed.

Titleist performance at a value price.

Vice Pro Zero

$24

High swing speed, mid to low handicap player.

Durable, performance ball at a value price.

Nitro Ultimate Distance

$7

Beginner often looking to re-load and doesn’t demand performance.

The cheapest golf ball to even consider playing.

Bridgestone e12 Contact

$30

Mid handicap, senior, slicer.

The straightest traditional golf ball on the market, making the $30 price tag a no-brainer for many players.

Piper Green

$17

Lower swing speed looking for distance and stable flight.

Excellent alignment aid.

Srixon Soft Feel

$23

Low to moderate swing speed, prefer soft-feeling ball.

High launch with great feel.

Noodle Long and Soft

$12

Low to moderate swing speed player who wants maximum distance.

Excellent distance and feel.

Top Flite XL Distance

$13

Moderate to fast swing speed player who wants distance.

Better stopping power than most value golf balls.

Precept Laddie Extreme

$25

Golfer who often plays in windy conditions.

High launch and "wind-cheating" dimples.

Callaway Supersoft

$25

Moderate to low swing speed golfer who prioritizes feel.

Superb feel.

Maxfli Straightfli

$20

Any player who wants accuracy above all else.

Unique dimple pattern helps the ball fly 20% straighter.

Kirkland Signature 2.0 - Best Cheap Golf Ball Overall

Kirkland Signature golf ball with badges
Image courtesy of Costco Wholesale

Price

$34.99 for 24 balls ($1.46/ball)

Construction

3-piece

Dimples

338

Player Profile

Mid to low handicap player who demands performance

Notes Non Costco members can order online, but pay a 5% surcharge

The Kirkland Signature v2.0 golf ball tops our list of the best cheap golf balls on the market because, dollar-for-dollar, it’s simply the best golf ball available today. The 3-piece ball performs almost identically to a $50 per dozen tour ball at just under $18. Of course, since it’s sold at Costco, you can’t buy just 12, instead, the minimum purchase is a double pack with 24 balls. But with the quality Kirkland Signature delivers, nobody will mind having 24 of these around.

The original cult classic 4-piece Kirkland Signature ball was so similar to Titleist's top offerings that Acushnet (Titleist’s parent company) took Costco to court on 11 patent violations. The results of that legal scuffle are technically unknown, but afterward Kirkland Signature released its current 3-piece model. While the v2.0 isn’t a carbon copy of the Pro V1, it is still the best value golf ball available.

Pros:

  • Matches the performance of a premium ball at around one-third of the price
  • Penetrating ball flight
  • High spin with short irons 

Cons:

  • Non-Costco members pay 5% surcharge
  • Must buy a minimum of 24 balls at a time
  • Unproven quality control could result in more imperfect balls

Titleist TruFeel

Titleist TruFeel golf ball with badges
Titleist

Price

$24.99/dozen ($2.08/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Dimples

376

Cover

TruFlex

Player Profile

Players who prefer soft-feeling ball

Titleist introduced its redesigned TruFeel golf ball in early 2022 as its softest feeling golf ball in the family.

The Titleist TruFeel features a large, 1.6-inch core and a thinner TruFlex cover, which is Titleist’s proprietary cover that marries the soft feeling with control around the greens.

The benefit of the large core is added distance, putting the TruFeel squarely in the long and soft category. The subtle but effective alignment aid on the side of the ball provides a good reference, but isn’t distracting.

Players who prefer a soft ball and want to game the top golf ball brand in the industry will naturally gravitate towards the Titleist TruFeel. At under $25 a dozen, the TruFeel is not only Titleist’s softest ball, it’s the family’s most affordable. That’s quite the appeal for Titleist’s brand loyalists, of which there are many.

Pros:

  • Lowest-priced Titleist golf ball
  • Large core boosts distance
  • Good alignment aid

Cons:

  • May be too soft for some players
  • Low trajectory and low long game spin may not fit players who need help getting the ball airborne

Vice Pro Zero

Price

$119.95/5 dozen ($1.99/ball)

Construction

3-piece

Dimples

344

Cover

Urethane

Player Profile

Long hitters, mid to low handicap players seeking performance

It didn’t take long for Vice Golf to ascend from a pesky direct-to-consumer alternative to the household brands to a major player in the golf ball industry. Unbiased testing has proven time and time again that Vice golf balls are just as good as the premium balls they rival, but at a much more palatable price.

The Vice Pro Zero is the newest offering from Vice, and suits a wide range of golfers at a bargain price. The Pro Zero can handle the fastest swing speeds and delivers a delightful dispersion, helping keep you in the fairway more often. Meanwhile, the urethane cover gives the Pro Zero the wedge spin you need to hold greens. The dimple pattern is designed to give you a medium-high ball flight. If you’re a mid to low handicap golfer who swings driver over 95 miles per hour, the Pro Zero is Vice’s best value offering for you. 

Pros:

  • 3-piece construction
  • Great for driver swing speeds 95 MPH and above
  • Stable ball flight

Cons:

  • Must buy 5 dozen or more to get lowest price
  • Mid to high trajectory could be too high for better players

Nitro Ultimate Distance

Nitro Ultimate Distance golf ball with badge

Price

$19.97/45 balls ($0.44/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Dimples

Amount unknown

Cover

Surlyn

Player Profile

Beginner still learning to strike the ball consistently

If you're looking for the absolute cheapest golf ball to consider gaming, check out the Nitro Ultimate Distance. At just $7 for a 12-pack, or 45 balls for $20, you really can’t go wrong with putting these in play if you’re just looking for a golf ball, and not much else.

All the fancy golf ball technology in the expensive golf balls really won’t help your game until you’ve learned to strike the ball clean consistently, develop some distance, and discover some tendencies in your game that you’d like to correct. If you prefer a golf ball you can lose in the water or the woods without losing sleep, the Nitro Ultimate Distance is the best choice for you.

The main appeal of the Nitro is the rock bottom price, but Nitro packs some performance features into the ball as well. The dimple pattern is designed for a high ball flight and the 2-piece construction and titanium core give you maximum distance.

Pros:

  • Cheapest golf ball to consider gaming
  • Built to maximize distance
  • Designed for high ball flight, which will help most players in this category

Cons:

  • Balls do not come in sleeves, just loose balls
  • Lacks some short game feel
  • Unstable ball flight in the wind

Bridgestone e12 Contact

Bridgestone e12 Contact golf ball with badge
Dick's Sporting Goods/Golf Galaxy

Price

$29.99/dozen ($2.50/ball)

Construction

3-piece

Dimples

326 CONTACT Force Dimples

Cover

Ionomer

Player Profile

Mid-handicap who wants to hit the ball straigter

While many golf ball manufacturers tout the tech inside their golf balls, Bridgestone has made some upgrades that are obvious at first glance with the Bridgestone e12 Contact golf ball. The unique dimple pattern, which Bridgestone calls CONTACT Force dimples, is essentially a raised dimple inside the traditional dimple. The theory is that these dimples create more contact with the club, resulting in higher ball speed. In fact, Bridgestone claims a 38% increase in contact.

After personally testing these balls, it’s clear that there is merit to Bridgestone’s “Straight Distance” claim. Sidespin is noticeably reduced, turning punishing slices and hooks into much more manageable pushes and pulls. On the downside, that reduced spin comes at a cost. Holding greens can be a bit more challenging with the e12 Contact.

The e12 Contact is a great ball for mid-handicap golfers whose top priority is to hit the ball straighter and reduce a hook or slice and can live with a little less control hitting into greens.

Pros:

  • Less side-spin results in tighter dispersion
  • Maximum distance with irons

Cons:

  • Not as much spin as advertised
  • Ball speed suffers with woods

Piper Green

Piper Green golf ball with badges
Piper Green

Price

$16.99/dozen with Subscribe & Save ($1.42/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Dimples

332

Cover

DuPont Surlyn

Player Profile

High-handicapper and slower swing speed player looking for max distance and tighter dispersion

Piper golf balls launched in 2021 with two main objectives. First, to provide affordable, high-quality golf balls to amateur golfers. Second, to simplify the golf ball buying process. The direct-to-consumer model has served Piper well, while its refreshing color-coded ball models make finding the right ball easy. 

Piper’s Green model is its introductory offering, built for beginners, higher handicap players, and golfers with slower swing speeds. As a softer, 2-piece ball, the Green returns good distance from humble swing speeds. 

“Piper has found the fine line between inexpensive and cheap with the Piper Greens,” said Piper founder Mike Gottfried. “For less than $20 you get fantastic distance and feel.”

The subscribe and save option is a “why-didn’t-I-think-of-that” solution to save even more money and not have to worry about running out of balls. Both of these perks should appeal to golfers searching for the best value ball.

Pros:

  • Low spin helps dispersion
  • Good distance with moderate and slow swing speeds
  • Effective alignment aid

Cons:

  • Low spin makes holding greens and shaping shots more challenging

Srixon Soft Feel

Srixon Soft Feel golf ball with badges
Dick's Sporting Goods/Golf Galaxy

Price

$22.99/dozen ($1.92/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Dimples

338 Speed Dimples

Cover

Ionomer

Player Profile

Players who prefer soft feel, want a higher-launching ball and don’t demand stopping-power

At $23 per dozen, the Srixon Soft Feel will grab the attention of golfers who appreciate an established brand, and a bargain ball. With a compression of just 60, the Soft Feel is a great ball for players with slower swing speeds and those who want to maximize distance with their full swings.

The Soft Feel is a low-spinning golf ball, so it lacks the stopping power on the greens that most premium balls provide. But if you’re the type of player who comes up short more often than you fly it over the green, that extra rollout might not be such a bad thing. High swing speed players, those who swing their driver 95 miles an hour or faster, would benefit from a higher-compression ball than the Soft Feel.

The dimple pattern on the Soft Feel is designed for high-launch, which it delivers, which results in a steeper descent and offsets some of the low-spin to help the ball stop quicker. 

Pros:

  • Reputable brand at direct-to-consumer price
  • Unique color and matte finish options
  • High launch will benefit many players searching in the value category

Cons:

  • Very low wedge spin reduces stopping-power
  • High swing speeds will over-compress the ball

Noodle Long and Soft

Noodle Long and Soft golf ball with badges

Price

$21.99/2 dozen ($0.92/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Dimples

342

Cover

Surlyn

Player Profile

Moderate to slow swing speed looking for extreme distance

Who needs confusing golf ball names like Pro V1x and Chromesoft X LS when you can simply go with Long and Soft? The Noodle Long and Soft is just that, long and soft. The super-low 34 compression makes the Noodle one of the softest golf balls you can buy, and if you swing your driver under 95 miles per hour, you’ll notice some extreme distance with the easy-to-compress Noodle Long and Soft.

The Noodle was previously manufactured by Maxfli, but today is produced by TaylorMade. The benefit of equipment from the major equipment manufacturers is that you can trust the highest level of quality control, so you’re less likely to get an imperfect ball than through a newer or direct-to-consumer brand.

As with most balls that emphasize distance, the sacrifice is spin. If you play the Noodle Long and Soft, don’t expect much precision and stopping power around the greens or on full shots in to greens. However, many players who fit this profile happily exchange some greenside precision for maximum distance, which is why the Noodle has been such a popular ball for decades.

Pros:

  • Superior distance
  • Super low compression makes it easy to compress
  • Excellent value at under $1/ball

Cons:

  • Higher (95 MPH+) swing speeds will lose distance
  • Sacrifices in short game spin

Top Flite XL Distance

Top Flite XL Distance golf ball with badges
Dick's Sporting Goods/Golf Galaxy

Price

$15.99/15 balls ($1.07/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Dimples

Distance Dimple Technology

Cover

Ionomer

Player Profile

High to mid handicap player with moderate to fast swing speed (90+ MPH)

Many of the balls on this list promise distance, with a catch. The Top Flite XL Distance also promises distance, and technically also has a catch, but it’s a different catch than other balls, meaning it fits a different profile of golfer. This is a ball for a faster-swinging player who doesn’t necessarily need the extra help of a low-compression ball to get distance. That means golfers who swing their driver in the 95 and above miles per hour range can play the XL Distance without sacrificing distance by over-compressing the ball, which they would likely do with many of the other balls on this list.

At just over a dollar a ball, this 2-piece distance ball features an ionomer cover that promises to be ultra-durable. The main drawback with the XL Distance is a lack of feel. These balls feel notoriously hard, which Top Flite even acknowledges with a below-average “feel” rating right on the back of the box. If feel is your top priority, there are other options in the Top Flite golf ball lineup that might better suit you.

Top Flite rates spin right there alongside feel, about 40% of the way up the scale, but the XL Distance still likely provides more spin and stopping power than the softer, lower compression balls in this category.

Pros:

  • Superior distance
  • Extremely durable cover
  • Best distance ball for higher swing speed players

Cons:

  • Hard feel is a turn-off for some golfers

Precept Laddie Extreme

Precept Laddie Extreme golf ball with badge
Bridgestone Golf

Price

$24.99/24 balls ($1.04/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Dimples

372

Cover

Ionomer

Player Profile

Players who want to launch the ball higher

The Precept Laddie Extreme is a spin-off of the Precept Lady golf ball, created when Precept realized its original version appealed to any golfer with a slower swing speed, not just women. The Laddie Extreme, like many distance-first golf balls, is designed for players with slower swing speeds, primarily women and senior golfers. It has a 2-piece construction and 372-dimple pattern that promises to fight the wind, which many golfers can appreciate. The ball is also designed to launch high with low spin, helping you hit it straighter.

However, if you have a moderate to fast swing speed, steer clear of the Laddie Extreme. Too fast of a swing speed, over 90 to 95 miles per hour, will over-compress the ball, sacrificing distance.

Pros:

  • Great option for low to moderate swing speeds
  • Long off the tee and soft around the greens
  • “Wind-cheating” dimple design promises stable ball flight in windy conditions

Cons:

  • Too soft for players with higher swing speeds

Callaway Supersoft

Callaway Supersoft golf ball with badges
Callaway Golf

Price

$24.99/dozen ($2.08/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Dimples

332

Cover

Hybrid cover featuring Paraloid Impact Modifier

Player Profile

Moderate to slow swing speed looking for distance and soft feel

Callaway golf balls have come a long way in recent years and the Callaway Supersoft is one of the most popular balls in the current Callaway lineup. That’s because as a low-compression ball – the lowest in the Callaway family – it caters to the largest demographic of golfers, players with moderate swing speeds who are looking for more distance and accuracy.

As a low-spinning ball, the Supersoft goes farther on full swings, and less spin also means less side-spin, which means straighter shots. Or at the very least, less severe slices and hooks, which could keep you in play more often and help lower your score.

More advanced players may prefer a premium ball that will be more receptive to shot-shaping and hold greens easier, but the benefits of the Supersoft fit the needs of most golfers.

Pros:

  • Great soft feel
  • High trajectory
  • Excellent distance

Cons:

  • Spin could actually be too low with driver
  • Spin rates may be less consistent than with a premium ball

Maxfli Straightfli

Maxfli Straightfli golf ball with badges
Dick's Sporting Goods/Golf Galaxy

Price

$19.99/dozen ($1.67/ball)

Construction

2-piece

Cover

Ionomer

Dimples

374 large and small dimples designed for straighter flight.

Player Profile

Beginner to intermediate players looking for maximum accuracy off the tee

If your top priority in a golf ball is to hit it straighter, try the Straightfli golf ball from Maxfli. The Straightfli is unlike virtually any other golf ball that claims better accuracy. That’s because instead of achieving accuracy by virtue of a soft, low-spin ball, the Straightfli goes all-in on accuracy with a unique – and completely legal – dimple pattern with a strategic combination of large and small dimples. The result, according to Maxfli, is 20% straighter shots. 

That doesn’t mean you’ll hit every fairway and green with the Straightfli, but it does mean that a 40-yard slice out of bounds could turn into a 32-yard push that stays in play. A missed approach shot into a greenside bunker could turn into a green in regulation or a straight-forward up-and-down from the fringe. These incremental improvements add up over the course of an 18-hole round. 

The biggest drawback of the Straightfli is a lack of feel in the short game. While many players might be bothered by this, those who find a performance improvement in the accuracy department will easily look past the feel.

Pros:

  • Unique dimple pattern designed for straight flight
  • Effective alignment aid
  • Straightest legal golf ball

Cons:

  • Hard feel around the greens

Choosing a Great Cheap Golf Ball

You know you want a cheap golf ball, but you still have to narrow down your search. Here’s how to pick the best cheap or value golf ball for your game.

Price

Is price your only priority? If that’s the case, simply grab the cheapest golf ball you can find and don’t worry about how many you lose. Take note of any performance tendencies, and as you begin to improve, you can find a golf ball that addresses your changing needs.

Our main recommendation when picking simply the cheapest golf ball you can find is to avoid used golf balls, also referred to as reconditioned or recycled golf balls. Balls that were fished out of a water hazard are likely water-logged and won’t perform well. Some of these balls have also been known to be stamped as a premium ball despite in fact being a discount ball.

RELATED: The Best Putters Under $100 & $200 | The Best Value Drivers of 2022

Swing Speed

After price, your next consideration should be your swing speed. As you’ve noticed, many of the golf balls on this list cater to slower to moderate swing speeds. That’s because they are mostly soft-feel, 2-piece golf balls. If you swing your driver less than about 95 miles per hour, any of these balls will fit you well.

However, if you have a faster swing speed, you should play a higher-compression golf ball. Otherwise you will over-compress the ball and lose distance. There are a few options on this list designed for players with faster swing speeds.

Tendencies

Are there certain tendencies in your golf game that you want your ball to help with? Perhaps you need a ball that will help you hold greens on approach shots, or a ball that flies as straight as possible to help reduce a slice or hook. Take note of your top one or two priorities and find a ball targeted towards those. 

Just keep in mind that no ball truly has it all. If you want a straight-flying golf ball, you’ll likely sacrifice some feel, and if you want the most distance possible, you’ll probably sacrifice some stopping power on the greens. It’s all about picking where you want your ball to perform, and what sacrifices you can live with.

About the Author

Nick Heidelberger is the Editor of GolfLink and an active member of the Golf Writers Association of America (GWAA). He covers all things golf, from the professional tours to rules, equipment, style, and golf history. In the years prior to joining GolfLink, he worked for the New England Section of the PGA of America. Nick has a degree in journalism from the University of Idaho and has been an avid golfer for more than 10 years.