Step Back to Fix Swing Mechanics

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Step Back to Fix Swing Mechanics
Category: Swing Mechanics
Sub-Category: Psychology, Course Strategy

Video Transcript

Video Golf Tip | Step Back to Fix Swing Mechanics

From time to time we all have to work on the mechanics of our golf swing. Many times though, when we are on the course this becomes a bit of a problem because we get too caught up in swing mechanics. One of the things that I have found to be very helpful is to have a golfer imagine that they have a workshop about four or five feet behind their ball. They step back, they get into their workshop and they do all of the mechanical fixing there rather than at the ball. What we will have you do is go to an imaginary workshop, draw a line and when you get your mechanics done. Step across that line and step up to the shot and be a natural athlete. Kim is going to demonstrate that here as she steps back and goes into her workshop. She focuses on the mechanics that she wants to incorporate into her swing, she gets those firmly fixed in her mind and now she’s ready to step across the line of her workshop and become a natural athlete. Remember, get all of your mechanical work done in your workshop and then when you step across that line, you’re going to swing like an athlete.

About the Instructor
Dr. Richard Coop
Dr. Richard Coop
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
School of Education
CB 3500 Peabody Hall
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3500

Dr. Richard Coop is a mental instructor to countless PGA Tour professionals, including Payne Stewart, Ben Crenshaw, Mark O'Meara, and Nick Faldo. He is also the author of The New Golf Mind and Mind Over Golf.


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