Fairway Bunker Shots

By Tim Cusick

Fairway Bunker Shots

I am on the eighteenth hold of the TPC Golf Course at the Four Seasons Resort and Club in Dallas. Home of the EDS Byron Nelson Championship. I am in a fairway bunker on the right hand side of the fairway and this is the exact spot that Adam Scott hit a shot to lead to his birdie putt on the second playoff hole to win the Championship in 2008 against Ryan Moore. He was faced with about 125 yard fairway bunker shot and for most golfers this is a very, very difficult shot, even with a good lie. The reason why it is so difficult is because you have to make solid contact with the golf ball in order to make sure you don't hit it fat. Thin is always better than fat out of a fairway bunker shot. The things he had to be focused on was number one, putting the ball back in his stance a little bit so he could insure solid contact. The second thing is to make sure he is moving through the entire shot with his lower body and his arms. He does not want to stop with either one of them. Both of those things allow him to make solid contact with the golf ball. I am going to go ahead and give it a shot here. I have the ball back in my stance, I dig my feet in just a little bit, set my hands just a little forward of the golf ball, and I am going to focus on moving through the shot with my lower body and my arms. So the goal when you are playing out of the fairway bunker is you have to make sure that you make solid contact. Put the ball back in your stance, make sure you let your lower body move through and finish all the way through with your hands and arms. If you do those three things you will be very successful in fairway bunkers.


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