Dr. Dick Coop - Philosophy

Every golf shot starts in the mind of the golfer. Before we ever pull the club out of the bag, we have made numerous decisions regarding lie, slope of ground, distance to target, wind direction and strength of wind, firmness of green, visualization of shape and height of the shot. We know that the ability to score well on any course is our ability to control our ball. The ball is controlled by the clubface, and clubface is controlled by the player's body, and the body is controlled by the mind. Again, we arrive at the same point-the importance of the mind in playing golf. Therefore, it is critical to know how the golfers mind works.

No two golfers play the game the same way just as no two golfers learn in exactly the same way. During my 25 years of working with the best golfers in the world on the PGA, LPGA, and Senior PGA Tours, I have consistently been fascinated by how differently these world class golfers received and processed the information I was presenting to them. However, I have been equally as interested in observing high handicap golfers with whom I have worked in seminars and clinics at golf courses around the country. I have learned something from every student even if it is only what will not work in any given teaching situation. Therefore, I work very hard to find a different way of presenting the same concept to different learners.

The basis paradigm that use in working with golfers can be represented by the formula:

Performance = Potential - Interference

This formula is simple without being simplistic. It clearly shows that in order for your performance to equal your potential, you must eliminate interference. Each golfer has his / her own unique sources of interference and it is important that each golfer identifies these sources of interference. For example, one of the more common sources of interference for many golfers is fear, both fear or failure as well as fear of success. Actually, if you examine the dynamics of these two fears, you will find that frequently one is merely the flip side of the other. For example, most people develop a fear of success because they are afraid if the perform at a high level once, they will be expected to perform at this level consistently and they fear that they can never live up to this standard. Therefore, fear of failure quite often is the genesis of fear of success.

There are many other sources of interference, which prevent golfers from reaching their potential. For example, unrealistic expectations, limited self concept development, disruptions in personal life, fatigue both physical and mental, loss of perspective, and lack of concentration skills are just a few examples of interference experienced by many golfers.

It is critical for each golfer to identify his/her consistent sources of interference and develop strategies to eliminate as many of these interference's as possible. I am excited that the format of GolfLink.com will allow the opportunity to present information in an individual and instantaneous manner. This allows each golfer to take the initiative in improving their own game and the quality of the "faculty" assembled by GiolfSpan.com is the best available in the profession. Let's go to work.

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