How to Mark a Titleist Golf Ball

By Matthew DeBord

Titleist manufactures by far the most popular line of balls in golf. They make balls for professionals, good amateurs and recreational players of all types. A recent national advertising campaign has capitalized on the fact that professionals mark their balls in unique ways. This is so they can identify their balls if needed. Obviously, there are many ways to mark a Titleist, limited only by one's imagination.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy
Step 1
Choose a pen or a pencil. Many golfers mark their ball using a Sharpie-style permanent marker. Before Sharpies came along, most people used a golf pencil. Golfers who still favor pencils usually just makes dots around the "Titleist" script or number on the ball. Golfers who use markers can be more creative.
Step 2
Decide whether your mark is going to be complex or simple. A single dot over the "T" will do the trick, as long as no one else in your playing group uses the same mark. Duffy Waldorf, a pro, asks his wife and children to draw ornate pictures all over his Titleists. Other pros and amateurs doodle little pictures on their Titleists. These pictures often have some symbolic value. An Australian my draw a kangaroo, for example.
Step 3
Consider using your initials. This deviates from the one-dot, two-dots, three-dots practice and makes it easy to tell which ball is yours. You could also use the initials of your children, your pets, your spouse, you mother or your girlfriend or boyfriend. The possibilities are endless.
Step 4
Don't confuse a putting line with marking your Titleist. Certain Titleist balls now come with a putting line pre-printed on the ball. This was done in response to many players adding a line to their ball, to use for alignment when putting. You should still mark your ball, ideally somewhere around the script.
Step 5
Make your mark your own. If you want to be like a most pros, pick a mark and always identify your Titleist in the same way. This becomes something like your signature.

Tips & Warnings

You pretty much have to mark your Titleist now. The practice has become so prevalent that it makes sense. Also, many players now play Titleist balls, so marking yours will help sort things out if you and one of your playing partners get confused. If you're playing in a tournament, be sure to show your playing partners your Titleist, noting both the number and the mark. If you take a ball out of play or have to get a new ball because you've lost yours, mark it promptly. If you do this in the fairway, be sure to show your playing partners the new ball once you arrive at the next tee.
You pretty much have to mark your Titleist now. The practice has become so prevalent that it makes sense. Also, many players now play Titleist balls, so marking yours will help sort things out if you and one of your playing partners get confused.
If you're playing in a tournament, be sure to show your playing partners your Titleist, noting both the number and the mark.
If you take a ball out of play or have to get a new ball because you've lost yours, mark it promptly. If you do this in the fairway, be sure to show your playing partners the new ball once you arrive at the next tee.
Why mark your Titleist? For one very good reason: If you hit the wrong ball, it's a two stroke penalty. If you're competing in match play, you lose the hole. Unless you're going for fancy artwork, don't mark your Titleist before you step on the tee. Once you decide on your mark for the round, don't change it.
Why mark your Titleist? For one very good reason: If you hit the wrong ball, it's a two stroke penalty. If you're competing in match play, you lose the hole.
Unless you're going for fancy artwork, don't mark your Titleist before you step on the tee.
Once you decide on your mark for the round, don't change it.

About The Author

Matthew DeBord has written about sports, cars, and wine since 1994 for a variety of publications. Formerly the golf columnist for the “Improper Hamptonian,” he has covered major championship tournaments and played some of the best courses in America. He graduated from Clemson University and has a master's degree from New York University.

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