Earnings for a PGA Tour Caddy

By Jessica Mousseau


The PGA Tour runs the most important golfing tournaments in the United States. It is the country's premier golfing organization and PGA Tour caddies are highly regarded. Caddies are essential to the game, and there are several benefits to being a PGA Tour caddie (sometimes spelled caddy) including making a set salary or a salary plus a percentage of what the player wins in a tournament.
 

Earnings of a Caddy

A PGA tour caddy is hired by a specific golfer, typically for the duration of the golfing season. They often have a long relationship with the player as a friend or coach. Caddies can make several arrangements with a player concerning his salary. Most PGA Tour caddies make between $1000 and $1500 per week, but they also make a percentage of what the player wins in the tournaments. This usually equates to 5 percent of any finish outside the top 10. Players breaking into the top 10, but not winning, will share 6-8 percent of their prize with their caddies. Winning players may share up to 10 percent of the prize money with their caddy. 

Other earning arrangements for caddies might include receiving no set salary and instead earning 10 percent of all prizes won by the golfers. Alternatively, some caddies may receive a higher weekly pay but no cut of the golfer's winnings. 

Function of a Tour Caddy

Caddies carry the golfers' equipment and supplies throughout the tournament and during practices. Caddies also often advise the golfers on weather conditions and which clubs to use in particular situations. They spend time researching and studying the golf course to be able to provide insight during tournament play. 

Some caddies are contracted to work at just a specific golf course or tournament, while others travel with their golfer to different tournaments throughout the year.

Time and Education Requirements

Most caddies work 30 weeks a year or less. This leaves almost 40 percent of the year free for them to pursue other jobs or enjoy their free time. There is little to no required education or experience needed to become a PGA Tour caddy, so many caddies are able to start working right after high school or college. What matters most is building up a reputation as a knowledgeable caddie

Benefits of Being a Caddie

There are several benefits to being a PGA Tour caddie in addition to the salary. Caddies often get paid to travel to exotic locations and stay in five-star resorts. Some caddies get disability and health benefits, although this is not standard.

The prestige of associating with the premier golf organization in the United States is also an important benefit in the eyes of many caddies. Caddying is often the first step to other jobs in the golf industry.

ACTIVITY FEED

Shelby N. joined GolfLink

Scott M.  left a review of Cobblestone

Daenzer R. joined GolfLink

Fabio C. added RedHawk to Favorites

Ralph G. joined GolfLink

View Activity Feed

Video of the Day
Outside Backswing Cure Watch Video>>

Related Articles

Article Image Pioneers of the Game: Ann Gregory - The First Black Woman to Compete at a USGA Event

Credit: USGA Museum   The history of golf in America,...

Article Image Here are the Golfers Most Likely to Earn Their First PGA Tour Win in 2019-2020

  The 2019-2020 PGA Tour season is just beginning, and alread...

Article Image Former Champion Georgia Hall’s Stolen Women’s British Open Trophy

photo by Dom Furore Georgia Hall is an English professional golfer...

Article Image New Faces on Tour: Who Earned Their PGA Tour Cards Through the Korn Ferry Tour?

  The Korn Ferry Tour, formerly known as the Web.com Tour, is...

Article Image Rory McIlroy’s Tour Championship Winning Clubs

  Rory McIlroy made himself $15 million richer by rising above ...

View All Related Articles