How Long Does a Hamstring Injury Take to Heal?

By Patrick Foley

Hamstrings are any of the three tendons which are contracted by the muscles in the back of the thigh. Hamstrings are necessary to do any activity that involves athletic movement, including running and walking. If throughout a swing you feel a pull or tear in the hamstring, an injury to the hamstring has occurred and you should stop immediately. It is crucial to understand how long it will take for the injury to heal.
 

Hamstrings Provide Stability

In golf, the hamstrings are utilized throughout the swing to keep the body stable as you turn through the stroke and power through the swing. When completing an athletic movement such as the golf swing there is always a chance you could pull or strain one of your hamstrings.

Healing Time

The healing time for a hamstring injury varies. Different degrees, called grades, of each injury will determine the actual healing time. It could take anywhere from a week to five weeks to heal.

Hamstring Injury Grade 1

A grade 1 hamstring strain will take about a week of recovery time. A grade 1 strain hurts minimally, there is no pain walking, and motion isn't hindered. But it is imperative that you not play golf or exercise your leg. Increased work and stress can be put on the leg after week one. If you jump into swinging or exercising immediately after the injury there is a good chance of increasing the severity of the injury.

Hamstring Injury Grade 2

A grade 2 hamstring strain will take two to three weeks of recovery for proper healing to occur. Do not allow yourself to put too much stress on the leg during this time because it will just increase the length of recovery time. With a grade 2 strain, you will have pain when walking, constricted range of motion, and tingling and pulling sensations in your leg. Avoid physical activity until these symptoms are gone.

Hamstring Injury Grade 3

A grade 3 hamstring strain will take three to five weeks for proper recovery. A person with a grade 3 strain may have trouble walking without assistance (i.e. without crutches). Also, there will heavy swelling in the area of the strain. Do not play golf or perform any activity during this recovery time. If you re-strain the muscle the recovery time will have to start all over again.

Decreasing Recovery Time

To have the minimum recovery time possible, seek physical therapy. Also, it is important to ice the muscle to reduce swelling and allow blood flow. Any rehab exercises will be beneficial to recovery as long as you don't put too much stress on the leg at first. The quicker you recover the faster you can be back on the golf course in top form.

About The Author

Patrick Foley is a writer from Phoenix, AZ. He is a sports fanatic and loves football, golf, and track. He has been writing for Golf Link for almost a year. He is a college football player at the University of Pennsylvania. He is enrolled in the Wharton Business School.He has have a wide set of skills in writing and marketing.

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