Methods to Speed Up an Electric Golf Cart

By Patrick Cameron

Electric golf carts are some of the most widely used carts in the golf industry. Their relatively quiet running engines on the course and dependability make them attractive options. If you happen to own one and you find that it doesn't quite have the horsepower you need, here are some steps you can take that will allow you to speed up your electric golf cart and get you around the course with greater ease. Doing some of the necessary things to make your cart go faster requires knowledge of how to get around an engine.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate
Step 1
Clean the engine. Use a rag and some hot, soapy water to go over the entire engine. A clean engine will naturally function at a better rate then one that is grimy and clogged up.
Step 2
Inspect the engine parts. Replace any parts and belts that are worn or in disrepair. Standard automotive tools will work for changing out most parts. If you're not mechanically inclined, it might be best if you take the cart to an authorized repair technician and have any parts changed that appear worn.
Step 3
Replace the motor. Once again, without proper training, this task may be a little too much to take on. You can get a variety of high-performance motors for golf carts, both from the manufacturer and after-market. Look online to ask your local golf shop about the possibilities of replacing your motor with a higher powered model.
Step 4
Switch the chip. Many electric carts have a chip that regulates the speed of the cart, much like a governor on gas carts. Some golf cart manufacturers, such as the E-Z-GO electric cart, offer chips that allow the cart to increase its top speed. Consult your owner's manual or company website to see if this is available for your golf cart.
Step 5
Change the gear ratio. Ideally for your cart to achieve more speed, you want a gear ratio of 6:1. The gears are located in the transaxle under the cart, between the motor and the drive axle.

Tips & Warnings

 
If you're are unskilled at mechanics, changing the gear ratio and replacing the motor should be left to a qualified service professional. Damage could occur. 

About The Author

Patrick Cameron is a freelance writer with 10 years of diverse experience in consumer goods branding, promotions and retail communications. He works out of his home in Denver, Colo. He received his Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from the University of Minnesota.

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