Cure For Heel Shots: Club Rotation

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Cure For Heel Shots: Club Rotation
Category: Shank & Toe Shots
Sub-Category: Hands, Impact, Swing Drills, Practice
Other videos in the series Cure Your Heel Shot with Chuck Cook:

Video Transcript

Video Golf Tip | Cure For Heel Shots: Club Rotation

A problem that often occurs with people that hit the ball in the heel is excessive clubface rotation through impact. If I were just to sole the center of the clubface behind the center of the ball, such as I am doing here, not moving any closer to the ball at all but just rotate the clubface either closed or open, what you can see is that the hosel of the club, or the heel of the club, actually moves closer to the ball. In fact the majority of those worst shots hit in the heel, the shank, come when the clubface is actually closed and the ball hits into the heel of the club and then spins in and bounces off the hosel. So what you are trying to do is eliminate excessive clubface rotation through impact. A real good drill for that is to try to produce what we call Dollar Bill Divots. What we are looking for in that, if you were to watch a lot of the touring professionals when they practice after they make contact with the ball when hitting an iron, is the clubface will stay square as it goes through the divot. So what will happen is that the divot will be square at the back, square at the front, and about the length of a dollar bill. If the clubface is turning through impact then the divot will be very skinny because only the toe of the club will be in to the ground like that. I am going to see if I can demonstrate the two types of divots and show you how to work to try to produce dollar bill divots as a drill to get rid of excessive rotation. This will be where I rotate the clubface through impact and you will seethe difference between this divot and the good divot. Now if you look at this divot here you can actually see that it is square at the back but towards the end of the divot you can see how the clubface is tailing out a little bit. T hat means that the clubface closed that much through the ball. Now for a shot that does not have a lot of rotation this clubface will be square at the beginning and the end of the divot, it will look something like this. You can see that the divot is just as wide at the end of the divot as it is at the back of the divot and it is about the length of a dollar bill. Working to try to make your divots look like this will get rid of those shots that are hitting the heel from excessive clubface rotation.

About the Instructor
Chuck Cook
Chuck Cook
Chuck Cook Golf Academy
Spicewood, TX 78669
Tel: 512-329-4000

Chuck Cook is instructor to such PGA Tour greats as Payne Stewart, Tom Kite, and Corey Pavin. He is listed as one of Golf Magazine's Top 100 Teachers and Golf Digest's #9 instructor in the world.


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