How to Remove Golf Shoe Cleats

By Matthew DeBord

In the good old days, golf shoes had cleats--more commonly called "spikes"--that were made of metal and could take years to wear out. These spikes caused a fair amount of damage to greens, however, and although some professionals still wear them, the majority of courses now require golfers to use so-called "soft spikes" exclusively. Soft spikes come in many different designs, but all are made of plastic or plastic-compounds and will wear out more quickly quickly than the old metal spikes.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy
Step 1
Keep an eye on the condition of your cleats or spikes. Typical soft spikes will last about six months, assuming you play once or twice a week. Once the spike part becomes worn down, it will be more difficult to "grip" the ground during your swing.
Step 2
Purchase a replacement set of cleats or spikes. This can be done at a pro shop or over the Internet. Companies that manufacture replacement sets will indicate on the packaging which shoe brands and styles can accommodate their spikes.
Step 3
Clean the soles of your shoes thoroughly. It will be easier to install the new spikes if the bottoms of your shoes are free from dirt, grass, sand and mud.
Step 4
Use the spike tool. Most replacement sets of cleats or spikes come with a small wrench that's designed to remove and replace spikes. If you lose it, some divot-repair tools have simple spike tool on one end.
Step 5
Make sure that the holes for the new spikes are clean. It will be easier to remove the new set when it wears out if you keep the small holes on the bottoms of your shoes clean during the replacement process.

Tips & Warnings

Experiment with different cleats or spikes. Some soft spikes are short, some are long, and some are extra-long. They also come in a variety of colors. Try out different styles to see what works for you. Purchase an extra set of matching spikes and keep it in your golf bag, just in case you lose or damage a spike or cleat while on the course.
Experiment with different cleats or spikes. Some soft spikes are short, some are long, and some are extra-long. They also come in a variety of colors. Try out different styles to see what works for you.
Purchase an extra set of matching spikes and keep it in your golf bag, just in case you lose or damage a spike or cleat while on the course.
If an old spike or cleat is damaged during replacement and gets stuck, you can usually remove it with a small knife. A Swiss Army knife or Leatherman tool is ideal for this, because it will often feature both a small knife and a pliers. If you can't remove the spike or cleat, you can sometimes return the shoe to the manufacturer for repair. The best way to prolong the life of a set of cleats or spikes is to wear your golf shoes only on and around the course.
If an old spike or cleat is damaged during replacement and gets stuck, you can usually remove it with a small knife. A Swiss Army knife or Leatherman tool is ideal for this, because it will often feature both a small knife and a pliers.
If you can't remove the spike or cleat, you can sometimes return the shoe to the manufacturer for repair.
The best way to prolong the life of a set of cleats or spikes is to wear your golf shoes only on and around the course.

About The Author

Matthew DeBord has written about sports, cars, and wine since 1994 for a variety of publications. Formerly the golf columnist for the “Improper Hamptonian,” he has covered major championship tournaments and played some of the best courses in America. He graduated from Clemson University and has a master's degree from New York University.

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