How to Fix a Torn Muscle

By Michael Hinckley

Torn muscles are the occasional pitfall of an active golfing lifestyle. Golfers tear muscles in the legs, groin, chest or arms either from too much golfing in one day or by using improper form or new equipment. While painful, most torn, or "strained," muscles can be fixed fairly easily at home and within a few days if you know what to do. Some simple items from the pharmacy and some straightforward advice can have you back in the swing of things in no time.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy
Step 1
Stop what you are doing. As soon as you feel something is wrong with your muscle, stop andd rest the muscle. Continued activity may make your injury worse even though you may not feel pain right away.
Step 2
Apply cold. Ice cubes in a cloth bag, a reusable cold compress, a bag of frozen vegetables or even a sock filled with rice and placed in the freezer for 12 hours will allow you to reduce the swelling of the affected area. Re-apply cold about three to four times a day for the next 72 hours.
Step 3
Wrap the affected area snugly in an elastic-laced bandage like an Ace brand bandage. Compressing the area will prevent too much swelling. The bandage should remain over the next 72 hours except when applying cold.
Step 4
Raise the affected area above the level of your heart to prevent fluid build-up.
Step 5
Prepare for increased pain. Between the first 24 and 48 hours following a torn muscle, you should expect the pain to increase as your body deals with the injury. This mild increase in pain can be treated with mild analgesics.

Tips & Warnings

If your affected area continues to bother you after 72 hours, seek medical attention. If your muscles are stiff after treatment, place the sock full of rice in the microwave for 1 to 2 minutes and have a long-lasting heat pack to apply to the affected area.
If your affected area continues to bother you after 72 hours, seek medical attention.
If your muscles are stiff after treatment, place the sock full of rice in the microwave for 1 to 2 minutes and have a long-lasting heat pack to apply to the affected area.
If the pain does not abate after 48 hours or cannot be dampened by a mild analgesic, seek medical attention immediately. Do not apply cold or heat directly to the skin as this may damage your skin; always place a towel or other cloth between the cold/heat and your skin.
If the pain does not abate after 48 hours or cannot be dampened by a mild analgesic, seek medical attention immediately.
Do not apply cold or heat directly to the skin as this may damage your skin; always place a towel or other cloth between the cold/heat and your skin.

About The Author

Michael Hinckley received a Bachelor of Arts degree in US history from the University of Cincinnati, a Master of Arts degree in Middle East history from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Hinckley is conversant in Arabic, and is a part-time lecturer at two Midwestern universities.

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