How to Make Golf Nets

By Steve Silverman

The bug bites most golfers, often after their first year of playing. They find they love going to the course and playing and they also like going to the driving range and practicing. However, sometimes it's inconvenient to drive 20 minutes to the driving range, pay $8 to hit a medium bucket of balls and drive home again. Instead, some golfers build their own golfing net so they can practice at home without losing time or spending money.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate
Step 1
Pick out a spot on your property that will be appropriate for a golf practice net. You may have room on your front lawn, but it will be very conspicuous there and you are likely to get many of your neighbors coming over to try it. You will probably have more success putting it in the backyard because you will have more privacy and fewer people watching you.
Step 2
Put together the frame of your golf net. This is done by connecting the plastic piping to the connecting joints. Start off with the back part of the net and build up. You can build a 7-by-8-foot net that will hold up to the elements and your golf shots.
Step 3
Take your poly-nylon netting and hook it up to your plastic frame. Connect it every 6 inches by stringing it along the edges. Make sure there is some give in the netting because you don't want your practice shots to come steaming back at you.
Step 4
Use foundation stakes on the bottom of the plastic piping in order to make sure the device will stand up after being used. The force of the golf balls will move the net or knock it down if you don't use foundation stakes.
Step 5
Pull up the foundation stakes so you can put the net away when it is not in use. You want to be able to use your front lawn or backyard for practice, but you don't want to leave the net up permanently. You can easily put it away by pulling the stakes. If you have limited storage space, you can take apart the plastic piping and put it together when you need it again.

Tips & Warnings

Practice regularly so you can improve your game. Even a 20-minute session in the middle of the week can help your game out.

About The Author

Steve Silverman is an award-winning writer, covering sports since 1980. Silverman authored The Minnesota Vikings: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and Who's Better, Who's Best in Football -- The Top 60 Players of All-Time, among others, and placed in the Pro Football Writers of America awards three times. Silverman holds a Master of Science in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism.

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