Golf Tips - Putting

By The Original Golf School

Putting is a little like shooting pool.
It requires touch and finesse.

The putting grip is different than the grip used for full shots. The putter should be held across the left palm so that the handle is between the two pads of your palm. The right hand grip should be in the fingers and palm. When the right hand is opened, it should be directly facing the line of the putt.

Close up of grip

Comfort is the key. Of course, you will have to tilt more from the waist than on a normal shot as the putter is the shortest club in the bag. Weight can be either equally distributed or you can lean on the left foot. Pick the balance position that feels most comfortable and "steady".

Close up of right hand about to close grip

There are 3 types of putting strokes:

The Shoulder Stroke:
The putter is swung completely with arms and shoulders, with virtually no wrist break. This is the stroke that appears to produce the most consistent and even putt. It is the one that most tournament players use and the one recommended for most players

Shoulder stroke stance

The Wrist Stroke:
The arms and shoulders remain stationary, and the putter is swung with the wrist and hands only.

Wrist stroke stance

The Combination Stroke:
The putter is swung with the wrists, arms, and some shoulder action. *





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