Golf Tips - Distance Control on your Putts

By Larry O. Krupp

There is no substitute for experience, but you can improve your estimate for how much effort you need to go a certain distance by doing the following. First, develop a preshot routine that includes 2 or 3 practice swings that closely approximate the amount of effort you feel is necessary. Next, position the putter so the sweet spot is directly behind the ball. Now, hit the putt and observe the distance. Do not be upset or irritated if the ball did not go the proper distance. Simply observe and accumulate data. Understand it is always a matter of more or less effort and your ability to hit the sweet spot. Do you know where your sweet spot is? Try this simple test. Hold the shaft of your putter between your thumb and forefinger. Gently tap on the face of the putter until the face rebounds straight back. This is the sweet spot. If the putter face torques or wobbles at all when you tap it, the same thing will happen when you hit the ball on that spot. *





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