Vintage Golf Cart Information

By Mike Camunas

Vintage golf carts are a rarity. They're hardly seen on the course, but if they are, it's because an owner has either restored one or has taken very good care of one. They're a luxury item for golfers, and that's because they can be expensive to buy or build. Parts have to be purchased, sometimes from all over the country, but there is plenty of help and guidance from different websites and catalogs to find or build a vintage golf cart.
 

Facts

Vintage carts can be built from scratch or they can be restored. Similar to classic cars, many can be built using remade vintage parts that you can purchase online at websites such as vintagegolfcartparts.com. This site and others sell products from accessories to batteries to engines to wheels to windshields. Most of the websites also offer instructions and manuals to help you build various types of carts. The sites are designed to help a buyer search by brand name, that way it's easier to find products for the type of cart being built. These websites can also helps buyers find sellers through a classified section.

Function

Owning a vintage golf cart is usually just a novelty. You can make a golf cart look anyway you want, but in the end, it does the same thing a regular cart does: It carries the clubs and the person around the course and/or neighborhood.

Types

There are various types of vintage golf carts; some of the main brands are Marketeer/Westinghouse Taylor-Dunn, Club Car, Cushman, E-Z-GO, Harley Davidson, Melex Pargo and Yamaha. Many of these types have just three wheels: one in the front and two in the back. Cushman is one of the oldest cart companies; it introduced its scooters in the 1930s. E-Z-GO is one of the most common cart brands, and the one most used at golf clubs. Yamaha was introduced in 1978 and is now the cart most golfers buy for their personal use.

Identification

Many vintage golf carts are painted bright colors, such as light blues and reds. Others have small doors as side panels. Some vintage carts can be made to look like vintage cars, as well. There are many body kits and vintage golf parts that can make a cart look like a car from the '60s and others that can make a cart look like a truck or some other vehicle.

Benefits

The main benefit of having a vintage cart is that is can be fixed up anyway you please. You can paint it, make it faster or slower, give it larger wheels because of the geography of your home course, or lower the cart to the ground for easier access. You can personalize it, which gives it sentimental value.

About The Author

Mike Camunas is also reporter for the St. Petersburg Times, covering local golf in the Tampa Bay area, from events to golfers hitting hole in ones, to even covering the professional events that hit town. He has been playing golf for about 11 years and has not seen his handicap lower. Maybe one day, but he'll stick to his day job for now.

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