What is Chippo Golf?

By Ryan Watson

 

Chippo is relatively new game that combines two favorite past times—golf and cornhole—into one enjoyable backyard game. Invented in 2017, the game was created by two friends self-described as “washed up athletes”. They built a prototype and created a promo video hoping to crowdfund $12,000. Instead, they raised over $230,000 and created a fervor for Chippo. The object of the game is to chip a golf ball into holes on slanted boards while competing against an opponent. The game can be played individually or in teams of two, and the creators recommend using a 60 degree wedge, although any wedge can be used. It is perfect for backyard BBQs, tailgating and trips to the beach with friends.


 

Scoring

The game involves two slanted boards with one large hole in the center of the board and two smaller holes in the upper right and left corners. The boards are set 15 feet apart with the chip mat placed directly in front of the target board. Simply hitting the board is good enough for one point. If the ball ends up into the large central hole then that is three points while the two smaller points are worth five points each. If the ball bounces off your opponent’s chip mat and then either hits the board or goes into either hole then the points are doubled. So if the ball bounces off the chip mat and into the three point hole, it is worth six points.


 

Types of Chippo Games

There are two ways to play Chippo. The first is “match play”, a team game involving alternating turns. Each player chips three balls, and the team member with the highest score at the end of the round wins that “hole” for their team. It can be played over nine or eighteen holes, and just like match play in golf the team with the most holes at the end of the game is the winner. Alternatively, traditional cornhole scoring can be used. In this game, each team is trying to be the first to make it to eighteen points. However points cancel out, meaning only one team per round accumulates points. For example, if team A scores seven and team B scores ten, Team B wins three points for the round to go towards the eighteen point goal. If playing one on one rather than with teams, the same scoring rules apply for match play or cornhole style, however each golfer will play all six balls per turn rather than three.


 

Resources

 


 

About The Author

Ryan Watson is a freelance sportswriter and history professor. He has been an avid fan of golf since his father signed him up for golf camp as a young child. Ryan enjoys following the professional game and learning about new equipment and gadgets.

ACTIVITY FEED

Andrew W. joined GolfLink
Alejandro S. joined GolfLink

J H.  Scored 88 at  The Woodlands Columbia, South Carolina

Eric S. joined GolfLink
Joseph B. joined GolfLink

View Activity Feed

Video of the Day
A Simple Trick to Control the Distance of Your Chips and Pitches Watch Video>>

Related Articles

Article Image Callaway: Chrome Soft and Chrome Soft X Golf Balls Review

  The Callaway Chrome Soft and Chrome Soft X balls are tour bal...

Article Image Review of Wilson Zip Golf Balls

Specs The Wilson Zip golf ball is a three-piece multilayer b...

Article Image Types of Hole in One Memorabilia

  The odds of hitting a hole-in-one for the average golfer st...

Article Image History of the U.S. Open Trophy 

  The second oldest major championship in the world is also Ame...

Article Image Types of Putters

Of the three types of clubs - woods, irons, and putters - putters h...

View All Related Articles