How to Become a PGA Golf Professional

By Steve Silverman

You love the game of golf, and you are good at it. Perhaps you're a great player who regularly scores in the lows 70s and occasionally hits the 60s. You have decided you want a career in golf--not necessarily as a touring pro, but someone who can work at a golf course and give lessons and help others get acclimated to the game. If you want to become a Professional Golf Association (PGA) professional, you have to follow the right path.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging
Step 1
Hone your skills. If you are still in school, play for your high school team and play for your college team. The more competitions you enter, the better off you are. The more you play, the better your skill set will be and the better qualified you will be to help others with their game. Understand the nuances of the game and then you will be able to identify them while you are teaching them.
Step 2
Learn good communications skills. The ability to talk to others and listen to them is what will determine a good teaching pro from a bad one. There are several other steps to take (see below), but the ability to communicate will make or break a PGA pro. Make eye contact, think about what you say before you say it and listen well, and you will be on your way as long as you know what you are talking about.
Step 3
Get a job as a club pro or an assistant pro at a teaching facility or a golf club. You can do this without any professional affiliation. However, once you have been working about 6 months and pass a playing test, you can attend the Professional Readiness Organization (PRO) for certification.
Step 4
Enter the Golf Professional Training Program (GPTP) to become a fully accredited professional. You will take courses, attend seminars and get tested to determine your worthiness as a teaching pro. It takes about 3 1/2 to 4 years to get fully certified as a PGA pro under most circumstances.
Step 5
Take refresher courses throughout your career once you have become certified. Everyone has their own areas of expertise. Perhaps you know a lot about teaching the short game but you don't know as much about recommending equipment. These refresher courses will allow you to gain knowledge in all areas of the game that you can usefully pass along to your students.

Tips & Warnings

Work on your communication ability. This is the "make or break" skill that all teaching pros must have.

About The Author

Steve Silverman is an award-winning writer, covering sports since 1980. Silverman authored The Minnesota Vikings: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and Who's Better, Who's Best in Football -- The Top 60 Players of All-Time, among others, and placed in the Pro Football Writers of America awards three times. Silverman holds a Master of Science in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism.
Video of the Day
Overview Watch Video>>

Nearby Tee Time HOT Deals!

Tuesday, Mar 28 to Sunday, Apr 02

Related Articles

Article Image Becoming a Golf Professional

Becoming a professional golfer can seem like a daunting task. Millions ...

Article Image How to Become a Golf Teacher

Most golf teachers start out with the dream of becoming a great player ...

Article Image How to Become a PGA Class A Member

You love the game of golf and you have dreamed of a career on the pro t...

Article Image How Does A Golf Scholarship Work?

Earning a golf scholarship is a great way to get a college education fo...

Article Image About Golf Scholarships

Nearly 500 Division I and II colleges offer men's golf scholarships, an...

View All Related Articles